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    So, you’re planning to study in Canada? That’s awesome! But first, you need a Canada study visa in 2024 as usual. It’s different from a study permit, which is also a must-have. While the study visa lets you enter Canada, the study permit is what actually allows you to study at a Canadian school.

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    Here’s the deal: the study visa lets you live in Canada for your course duration. You can also work part-time during your studies and full-time during breaks. 

    To get this visa, you first need to apply for a study permit, plus have a valid passport and either an eTA or a visitor visa, depending on where you’re from.

    Canada is super popular among international students. In 2019 alone, there were over 640,000 international students here! They’re a big part of what makes Canada’s communities so vibrant and diverse.

    Getting to know all about it and how to apply is really important if you’re aiming to study in Canada in 2024.

    Let’s see how.

    How to Apply for a Canada Study Visa in 2024

    Are you applying for a Canada study visa in 2024? It’s pretty straightforward but needs some good planning. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

    Step 1: Get Your Acceptance Letter

    First things first, get accepted into a Canadian school. Choose a program that fits your goals, apply, and once you get that acceptance letter, keep it safe. It’s crucial for your visa application.

    Step 2: Apply for a Study Permit

    Now, it’s time for the study permit. This is different from your visa and is a must-have for studying in Canada. You can apply online or through a visa application centre. You’ll need:

    • Your acceptance letter.
    • A valid passport and two passport-sized photos.
    • Proof of financial support (like bank statements or scholarship letters).
    • Proof of identity (birth certificate, ID card, etc.).
    • Medical examination proof, if needed.
    • Police clearance, if needed.
    • A letter of explanation detailing your study plans and future goals.

    Step 3: Paying Application Fees

    Don’t forget about the fees:

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    • Study permit fee: CAD 150.
    • Biometric fee: CAD 85 (if required).
    • eTA fee: CAD 7 (for visa-exempt countries).
    • Visitor visa fee: CAD 100 (for visa-required countries).

    See more about the fee list here…

    Keep your payment receipt as proof.

    Step 4: Submit Your Application and Wait

    Submitting your Canada study visa in 2024; the final step is to submit your application along with all the documents and your receipt. If you need biometrics, get that done too. You’ll get a tracking number to keep an eye on your application status. The usual processing time is around eight weeks, but it can vary.

    Once your application is processed, you’ll get an email or mail notification. If approved, you’ll receive a letter of introduction and a visa sticker on your passport. If you still need to, you’ll get a letter explaining why.

    What are the Different Intakes and Deadlines for Studying in Canada in 2024?

    One of the important factors that you need to consider when applying for a Canada study visa is the intake. Intake is the term used to describe the start date of your study program in Canada. 

    There are three main intakes for studying in Canada: fall intakewinter intake, and spring intake. You need to be aware of the deadlines and the processing times for each intake and how to plan and apply early. Here is a comparison of the different intakes and deadlines for studying in Canada in 2024:

    Fall intake (September)

    The fall intake is the most popular and the most competitive intake for studying in Canada. It is the start of the academic year for most Canadian institutions, and it offers the widest range of study programs and courses. 

    The fall intake is ideal for students who want to have more options and flexibility in their education and who want to align their academic calendar with the Canadian one. However, the fall intake also has some drawbacks. 

    It is the most crowded and the most expensive intake, as the demand and the competition for admission and visa applications are the highest. It also requires more preparation and planning, as the deadlines and the processing times are the earliest. 

    The deadlines for the fall intake vary depending on the institution and the level of study, but they are usually between January and March of the same year. 

    The processing times for visa applications are also longer, as the volume of applications is the highest. Therefore, you need to apply at least six months in advance if you want to study in Canada in the fall intake.

    Winter intake (January)

    The winter intake is the second most popular and the second most competitive intake for studying in Canada. It is the start of the second semester for most Canadian institutions, and it offers a good range of study programs and courses. 

    The winter intake is ideal for students who want to avoid the rush and the pressure of the fall intake and who want to have more time to prepare and apply for their education. However, the winter intake also has some drawbacks. It is still a crowded and expensive intake, as the demand and the competition for admission and visa applications still need to be higher. 

    It also requires some adjustment and adaptation, as the weather and the academic calendar are different from the ones in your home country. The deadlines for the winter intake vary depending on the institution and the level of study, but they are usually between September and November of the previous year. 

    The processing times for visa applications are also shorter as the volume of applications is lower. Therefore, you need to apply at least four months in advance if you want to study in Canada in the winter intake.

    Spring intake (May)

    The spring intake is the least popular and the least competitive intake for studying in Canada. It is the start of the summer semester for some Canadian institutions, and it offers a limited range of study programs and courses. 

    The spring intake is ideal for students who want to have less competition and lower costs for their education and who want to enjoy the warm and sunny weather in Canada. However, the spring intake also has some drawbacks. It is the most restricted and the most challenging intake, as the availability and the quality of the study programs and courses, are the lowest. 

    Spring session requires more research and flexibility, as not all institutions and levels of study offer the spring intake. The deadlines for the spring intake vary depending on the institution and the level of study, but they are usually between January and March of the same year. 

    The processing times for visa applications are also the fastest, as the volume of applications is the lowest. Therefore, you need to apply at least two months in advance if you want to study in Canada in the spring intake.

    You can use the following table to compare the different intakes and deadlines for studying in Canada in 2024:

    Intake Start Date Deadline Processing Time
    Fall September Jan-Mar 8 weeks
    Winter January Sept-Nov 6 weeks
    Spring May Jan-Mar 4 weeks

    New Rules for International Students in Canada in 2024

    The Canadian immigration landscape is evolving, especially for international students. Here are some key changes coming into effect on the Canada study visa in 2024:

    1. Enhanced Verification for Acceptance Letters (Starting December 1, 2023): Post-secondary designated learning institutions (DLIs) will be required to confirm each acceptance letter directly with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). This step aims to protect students from acceptance letter fraud.
    2. Recognized Institution Framework (Starting Fall 2024): IRCC will introduce a framework for post-secondary DLIs that excel in providing services and support to international students. These institutions will enjoy benefits like priority processing of study permits for their prospective students.
    3. Ambitious Permanent Residency Targets: Canada plans to welcome a substantial number of new permanent residents: 485,000 in 2024, 500,000 in 2025, and a consistent 500,000 after that. This plan focuses on economic growth, family reunification, and responding to humanitarian crises.
    4. French-Speaking Permanent Resident Targets: Starting in 2024, there are new targets for French-speaking permanent residents outside Quebec, increasing annually: 6% in 2024, 7% in 2025, and 8% in 2026.
    5. Two-Tiered Structure for DLIs (Starting 2024): A new system will categorize some DLIs as Trusted Institutions, offering expedited visa processing for their applicants. This is part of a broader strategy to modernize the International Student Program.
    6. Relaxed Rules for Online Study: IRCC has eased regulations for international students awaiting their Canadian student visas. The duration of online study programs has been extended without affecting eligibility for a post-graduate work permit.

    These updates reflect Canada’s commitment to improving the experience for international students and streamlining the immigration process. If you’re planning to study in Canada, staying informed about these changes is crucial for a smooth journey.

    Sources:

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    I'm Ian, a travel blogger with a background in publishing. My hobby is exploring new places, and here, I share my discoveries from quaint towns and bustling cities. Each trip inspires my next post, inviting you to join me on this exciting journey.